5 Myths about Sex Everyone Thinks Are True

What you didn’t learn in high school sex education: the surprising, science-backed proof about aphrodisiac foods, men’s and women’s desire, and more.

Myth: Sex burns major calories
Truth: Experts evaluate thirty minutes of sex burns 85 to 150 calories. Theoretically, you need to burn about 3,500 calories to lose a pound of body weight, so if you were using up 100 calories whenever you had sex, you could drop one pound if you had sex 35 times. The trouble is this: Many people are not having sex for thirty minutes. In its place, the average interval of sex is closer to five minutes. In actual fact, the major increase in your heart rate and blood pressure throughout sex only takes place for about fifteen seconds during orgasm, and then things rapidly return back to normal.

Myth: There’s a 10-year difference between women’s and men’s sexual peaks
Truth: Men’s testosterone peaks at around age 18, but women’s estrogen levels peak in their mid-20s. As low hormone levels have been connected with lesser sexual drive, some have asserted that when your levels are at their highest, your drive must be at its peak. But if we believe occurrence of sex to be the factor that matters most in sexual peak, then there’s no distinction between men and women. Sexual desire constantly fluctuates, and is connected to a number of factors than age. Throughout a lifetime, you will see your sexual craving and activity go up and down many, multiple occasions.

Myth: Sex can give you a heart attack
Truth: Having sex more often is related to having a healthier heart. In one study, men who reported having sex two times a week or more had a lesser risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The possibility of having a heart attack while you are having sex is also very low. The Framingham Heart Study discloses us that for men who are not diabetic or smoker, the possibility of having a heart attack throughout sex is one in a million! What if your heart has previously had problems? The reality is that the majority people just do not exert themselves that much during sex! The physical exertion many people put in while engaging in sex is like to climbing two flights of stairs.

Myth: Don’t leave socks on when getting intimate
Truth: A sex study in the Netherlands did brain examines on men and women while their accomplices endeavored to give them orgasms. Clearly, it was drafty in the scanning room, and a lot of study participants were complaining about having exact chilly feet. While the participants were offered socks to keep their feet tepid, considerably more were capable to have orgasms.

Myth: Oysters and chocolate are turn-ons
Truth: No study has ever demonstrated any sexual enhancement effect from oysters. They do have loads of zinc, which sperm require to be healthy, but otherwise scientists have found no special ingredient to suggest it has any sexually enhancing effects. Several studies propose that chocolate is tied to lower blood pressure and better functioning of blood vessels, which might keep the penis functioning healthy for erections. Chocolate can likewise fuel a tiny release of mood-boosting phenyl ethylamine and serotonin into our systems, and people who are in better moods may want to have more sex! So, if a food makes a man ponders sex—whether because it looks like intimate anatomy, as oysters might, or even because the person believes it might be an aphrodisiac—then that food might become an aphrodisiac.